MAKING MOVES IN MAUI

After camping in Kauai for four days, I took a plane to Maui, and made it to Banana Bungalow Hostel with enough energy to find my bed and crash. Located in Wailuku, Banana Bungalow was an absolute pleasure to stay in. Offering free tours everyday, I was able to explore the many neighborhoods and beaches of Maui with my new French Canadian roommates! 

PHOTO BY RYAN COUNCIL

PHOTO BY RYAN COUNCIL

A short walk from the hostel, we found ourselves at a local Wailuku treasure. Waterfalls are very common in Maui, and you stumble upon them constantly. Back at the hostel, we spent a lot of time getting to know each other over ping pong and limbo (thanks to their Cinco de Mayo party!) 

With the free tours, I was able to get to Haleakala National Park, which is in the southeastern part of Maui. Haleakala is Hawaiian for 'house of the sun,' but unfortunately the park was a just a 'house of rainy fog clouds' on the morning we ventured up into the crater. Making the most of it, we hiked into the crater for a bit, only to emerge back out, since we couldn't see a single thing. Guess I'll have to go back!

On my last day in Maui, I rented a car and drove the Road to Hana. It's a 64-mile road stretching from Paia to Hana and beyond. Again, the weather wasn't great, and the rain had me driving cautiously. The road to Hana is extremely windy and gorgeous, and no matter the weather it's a sight to be seen. There are little shops nestled on the sides of the road, selling things from jewelry to tacos to banana bread! Apparently, Hana is where banana bread was first created. I definitely grabbed a loaf or two of ba-HANA bread to munch on my return trip home.

Later that day, I took my adventure buddies that I had acquired at the hostel and we drove down to Little Beach in Kihei. We heard through the grapevine that an epic luau is hosted there every Sunday at sunset. The beach is indeed very small, and the only way to get there is from a rugged path up a cliff at the end of Big Beach. Once climbing over, we found ourselves on a secluded beach that had been taken over by local drummers, fire dancers, and tourists. Commonly known as a nude beach, Little Beach had all kinds of visitors, all meeting there for the same reason: to celebrate the sun and the beautiful island of Maui. I met a man named Joel, who taught us how to dance the good energy we had into the crowd of people. 

PHOTO BY RYAN COUNCIL

PHOTO BY RYAN COUNCIL

I was worried that after days of rain, my last night would be the same, but our 'good energy' parted the clouds and sun rays cascaded onto the people of Little Beach. Dancing till the sun slowly set, I gave my thanks to Maui for teaching me to say yes to everything and everyone I met.

PHOTO BY BRIAN LESEBERG

PHOTO BY BRIAN LESEBERG

Leaving that night, I climbed back to my car, and headed for the airport. I can't wait to go back to Hawaii. It was truly so beautiful everywhere I went and I know there is so much I've yet to see! Mahalo!